Working with Emotion

Book, “A Handful of Quiet,” by Thich Nhat Hanh

In the sweet little book written by Thich Nhat Hanh, A Handful of Quiet: Happiness in Four Pebbles (2012), Thich teaches a meditation in which we imagine ourselves being something such as a flower, and we imagine feeling a quality of that that thing within ourselves. (For example, in the case of the flower, he invites us to image feeling freshness.) Read more ›

in Articles,Working with Emotion

Healing as a Process. Inviting Spaciousness.

For today, first, a quote: Healing is an on-going, organic process, not a single ‘big bang’ moment (Pat Ogden & Janina Fisher, Sensorimotor Psychotherapy: Interventions for Trauma and Treatment, 2015, p. 73).

Aware that sometimes there can be overt, covert, external, internal, intentional, and/or completely unintentional and inadvertent messages that may lead one to wonder if there is something wrong with them Read more ›

in Articles,Compassion,General,Self-Compassion,Working with Emotion

Open group sessions, November and December 2017

The upcoming open group sessions I am offering provide clients with the opportunity to regularly nourish the seeds of mindfulness and self-compassion they are growing via guided, structured practice in a safe, group therapy environment, as well as providing the opportunity to have some time for connection with others and for self-reflection. Read more ›

in Announcements and Reminders,Compassion,Expressive Arts,Mindfulness,Self-Compassion,Working with Emotion

Bringing our whole heart does not mean bringing 25 percent of a heart (or somewhat more or even less)

Think of a being you deeply cherish, maybe it is a person, maybe it is a cherished pet. Take a moment to feel the presence of this being, to feel the warmth you feel toward this being, the joy, the delight. What do you wish for this being? What does your heart wish for this being? Connect to the feelings imbued in this wish. Read more ›

in Articles,Compassion,Self-Compassion,Working with Emotion

Taking in the Good: Dr. Rick Hanson on Countering the Negativity Bias

Did you know that the human brain tends to act like teflon to positive experiences and like velcro to negative experiences? This is a wonderful metaphor Dr. Rick Hanson uses in the video below to describe the brain’s negativity bias, in essence, its tendency to absorb and remember readily negative experiences and potential threats combined with its tendency to not so readily absorb and remember positive experiences. Read more ›

in Articles,Compassion,External Resources,Working with Emotion

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