External Resources

BounceBack: A Free Guided Self-Help Program Available to Ontario Residents

BounceBack is a free guided self-help program grounded in cognitive-behavioural therapy that is currently available for individuals living in Ontario who are ages 15 and older, have a valid health card number, and who are experiencing mild to moderate levels of depression, with or without anxiety. The program offers two forms of help: (1) online videos a participant can watch at any time, (2) telephone coaching and workbooks. Clients can self-refer or be referred by their primary care provider.

To learn more about the program, please visit the BounceBack website at bouncebackontario.caRead more ›

in Announcements and Reminders,External Resources,Working with Emotion

Where does your attention go and what goes with it?

In any given moment, we can ask ourselves questions about our attention: “What is my attention focused on right now? Where is my attention going? Is my attention focused broadly or narrowly? Is it moving around or is it stuck on one thing?” In any given moment, we can also bring curiosity to what emotional tone is going with our attention. Read more ›

in Articles,Compassion,External Resources,Mindfulness,Self-Compassion,Working with Emotion

“Compassion: An Introduction” — 2016 Video by The International Center for Compassionate Organizations

At this link you can watch a video on compassion that was produced, recently released, and generously shared by The International Center for Compassionate Organizations. For those who have participated in compassion-focused therapy sessions (e.g., via the mindful compassion group therapy program), some of the lines early on in the video will sound very familiar—I hope! Read more ›

in Compassion,External Resources

Taking in the Good: Dr. Rick Hanson on Countering the Negativity Bias

Did you know that the human brain tends to act like teflon to positive experiences and like velcro to negative experiences? This is a wonderful metaphor Dr. Rick Hanson uses in the video below to describe the brain’s negativity bias, in essence, its tendency to absorb and remember readily negative experiences and potential threats combined with its tendency to not so readily absorb and remember positive experiences. Read more ›

in Articles,Compassion,External Resources,Working with Emotion

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